1. vanfullersublime:

    The Noble Dunce

    The line between dunce and visionary is thin indeed, and the verdict has yet to be returned on this enthusiastic fellow. 

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  2. vanfullersublime:

    The Room of Blue Shadow

    Recently I discovered the work of the amazing Tim at secondlifephoto.tumblr.com. Having obtained Tim’s permission to plunder his collection, I set to work at once. Two days later, I finished this strange and slightly surrealistic picture.

    The colors are eerily exaggerated; the elements are arranged along straight horizontal and vertical lines. It’s an uneasy mix of passion and icy formality.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  3. vanfullersublime:

    Portrait Of the Artist As a Disagreeable Middle-Aged Man

    Sooner or later, every artist gets so desperate for material that he paints his own horrible self. Vincent van Gogh and Rembrandt painted countless self-portraits: Vincent did so because he had no money for models; and Rembrandt did so because he had lots of funny hats, and he wanted to show them off.

    I have lots of funny hats, too. This Panama hat—did you know they come from Ecuador?—is probably my favorite. The werewolf cane I imported from the Carpathian Mountains, around Transylvania.

    I buy my clothes from the homeless, but I never cut corners on accessories.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  4. vanfullersublime:

    The Yellow Studio

    This is the computer room of my studio, which I have painted before with black—really!—as the dominant color. 

    The effect was rather spooky, so I’ve brightened things up this time around.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  5. vanfullersublime:

    Ella, Still Smiling

    I never really know what to say about this remarkable woman except that she speaks volumes with her perennial smile.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  6. vanfullersublime:

    The Impatient Lover

    Here is Eve in a rough impressionistic piece. I am not used to working in quite so coarse and sketchy a style, but in this case it was fun to loosen up a bit.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  7. vanfullersublime:

    Milki In a Rust-Colored Room

    There is nobody quite like Milki. I have worked with over a hundred Tumblr models, each of them charming in her own way. But Milki is unique: Full-breasted and fully natural, she is like a proud demigoddess who has stepped into our world from some primordial forest. I can see her dressed only in a crown of flowers, seated on a moss-covered throne of chiseled stone.

    Anyway…I haven’t worked with Milki in a while because she’s been dealing with—personal issues, let’s say. Do us both a favor, please: Visit her blog for details, and if you can help her a little, please do.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  8. vanfullersublime:

    Poster for Oscar Wilde’s Salome

    Here I decided to forego the Art Nouveau approach that would have suited the period (meaning the days of Wilde, not the days of ancient Rome) and opted for a weird, expressionistic palette of primary colors.

    Wilde would have hated it. Fortunately neither of us has to worry about that.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  9. vanfullersublime:

    Le Chat Rouge

    Here’s another poster in the art nouveau style, this time featuring a chat. The actual chat was not rouge, but my French vocabulary is limited to maybe seven words. 

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  10. vanfullersublime:

    Will You Please Go Away, Gwyneth Paltrow?

    This is just a playful bit of non-objectivism, having no link to anything in reality. I have named it after Gwyneth Paltrow because she also has no link to reality.

    If she ever goes away, let me know.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  11. vanfullersublime:

    Table Six

    I have no idea who (or what) is seated at the other five tables. For that matter, I have no idea what (or who) is seated at Table Six, or why.

    Sometimes pictures simply demand to be painted, and they won’t explain themselves. When this happens, I have found that it is best to cooperate.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  12. vanfullersublime:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2xD9uTlh5hI

    As an artist, I am comforted to know that if I work hard and never pander to the masses, Tim Burton will make a movie about me.

    Your thoughts?

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  13. vanfullersublime:

    Marci In Red

    This one has already been bought by a discriminating Tumblr collector.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  14. vanfullersublime:

    Self Portrait, 1922

    Here is my second self portrait in “Gatsby” attire. This one looks quite realistic at first glance, but it’s actually rather sketchy in execution. The lighting is moody and Baroque; the subject is moody and broke.

    This picture was painted entirely for the amusement of Ms. Marci Lopez.

    (via vanfullersublime)

     
  15. vanfullersublime:

    Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror

    There was a time when cinematic vampires weren’t sexy.

    That trend started with Bela Lugosi, who interpreted the vampire as elegant, well-mannered and slightly overdressed. Most of the vampires who followed—those performed by Christopher Lee, Frank Langella, Tom Cruise and Gary Oldman in particular—were equally repellant and attractive.

    But the first vampire movie, 1922’s Nosferatu, offered uncomplicated horror. The film’s gaunt vampire, Count Orlok, was played by Max Schreck (his name means “horror” in German) as a stiff and ratlike freak without a shred of humanity, much less sex appeal.

    Count Orlok’s face is one of the iconic images of film. I’ve drawn it here as part of a faux movie poster from Art Deco days.

    (via vanfullersublime)